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Warren G. Harding--The Man Joe Mitchell Chapple

Warren G. Harding--The Man

Joe Mitchell Chapple

Published September 12th 2013
ISBN : 9781230280578
Paperback
18 pages
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 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1920 edition. Excerpt: ... THE HARDINGS A HARDYMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1920 edition. Excerpt: ... THE HARDINGS A HARDY BREED IN the early struggles of rearing the family, the definite plan of father and mother was to educate their children. Little was said of ancestors. They were too busy with the problems of the present. In moving about, many of the old relics and heirlooms and records were scattered, but relatives in the East kindly furnished the Harding brothers and sisters with the proof of their right to be enrolled as Sons and Daughters of the Revolution. In 1624 Stephen and Richard Harding arrived at Weymouth Landing, Mass., and joined the Plymouth Colony. Later, Amos Harding left for Rhode Island, and when the Revolution came it found his descendants had again removed to Orange County, New York, and many of the Hardings enlisted and fought in the Continental Army with the New York troops. The restless, adventuresome Harding spirit prevailed, and the family pushed on to Pennsylvania and settled in Wyoming Valley. On the morning before July 4 in 1778 the cry rang out in Wyoming valley, Remember the Hardings. The brave defenders of Forty Fort made their attack, only to be cut down by the Tory Butler and his rangers, assisted by the Seneca Indians in their mad blood-lust. There were three hundred victims in the massacre of Wyoming, and among them many Hardings, ancestors of Warren G. Harding, who stood their ground on the frontier and left a tradition of devotion to their firesides, their country, and their freedom that is imperishable. Under the willows in a lonely cemetery in this historic vale is a modest slab erected over the resting place of Hardings, on which is engraved the epitaph: Sweet be the sleep of those who preferred death to slavery. The Hardings fell three days before the tragic massacre that found its...